"Thinking of your horse as behaving badly disposes you to think of punishment. Thinking of your horse as struggling to handle something difficult encourages you to help him through his distress."- The Concordia Connection

November 18, 2016

This year I was fortunate enough to be invited to teach at Heroncrest Stables, near Ottawa Ontario. I was there in the spring and had a great group turn out for it. I got to go back in October and thought I’d share some of the pictures and stories with you now.

In the first clinic I introduced the foundation lessons and we did a lot of human with human learning. I always start this way and often revisit it. By taking the real horse out of the training/learning process and using a ‘human’ horse it allows for the learner (trainer) to have much less to worry about while learning the mechanical skills needed.

I have covered all the foundation lessons in my early blogs here so please head on back into the history and check them out.  Many have demo videos to help you learn.

The second clinic this October followed a s...

October 7, 2015

It is hard to believe it has been almost a year since ‘U’ came to live with me. It has been so wonderful to watch him change from a sullen, depressed horse that would stand in the back corner of his stall with a grumpy face and go away air about him into a bright eyed, nicker when he sees anyone and trots over to get a scratch kind of guy.

I know there are those of you thinking that that must have taken a lot of time and effort. Well it didn’t. That is one of the great things about positive reinforcement training. This spring and summer were very busy so everyone got a bit neglected in their opinion (they all love to play); perhaps only getting to play once a week.

During haying, or if I was away teaching, it was even less and yet everyone still made huge leaps forward in their abilities.


Here is the video of ‘...

April 2, 2015

Usually this blog is about ‘U’ but this week we are going to talk about ‘V’ or Valor. I wanted to talk a bit about him this week as a comparison to ‘U’.

Valor is my not yet two, two-year-old Azteca gelding. I have had Valor since he was about four months old. His weaning and transport would not be what I would call ideal, but he seems to have suffered no permanent emotional damage from it. I’ll just leave it at that. He had to have his feet done when we got him and as soon as possible as his legs were not growing correctly because of them. He was a star for that less than totally positive experience. I made it as positive as possible, having a great farrier who took it slowly and calmly, with lots of breaks and over a couple sessions, with lots of scratches, that valor seemed to enjoy while the whole thing was...

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